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Tunnels & Subways Files

Flyer: We Kept the Airplanes Flying with Chemical Grout!

Published Year: 2000

  • In 1997, serious leaks developed at George Bush Intercontinental Airport in a long utility tunnel connecting a passenger terminal with the central plant.

Ultrafine Cement Grout Seals Fissures in Salt Caverns

Published Year: 1999

  • The WIPP in New Mexico was created as an R&D facility to demonstrate safe, long-term disposal of radioactive wastes. However, before waste could be shipped to the plant, fissures in the underground salt cavern had to be sealed.

Magazine Article: Using Grout to Lock Pollution in Place

Published Year: 1998

  • In Pennsylvania, Rembco used grouting to contain oil leaking under an oil refinery’s sea wall. The concrete wall had been constructed on top of old wharf piling. Over time, tidal action caused erosion, resulting in leakage at the wall’s base.

Case Study: Leaks Stopped in Airport Tunnel

Published Year: 1998

  • At George Bush Intercontinental Airport (Houston, TX), the physical plant is connected to the passenger terminals by a tunnel. Cracks had developed in the ceiling of the tunnel, and by summer 1997, water was pouring into the tunnel and onto the pipes.

News: Subway System Rehabilitation

Published Year: 1998

  • This rehabilitation project consists of stopping leaks, replacing concrete, installing new tracks on the northbound side and filling voids underneath southbound tracks that were caused by water flowing underneath the tracks.

Magazine Article: Solving Trunk Sewer Installations Across Growth Faults

Published Year: 1996

  • The City of Houston has two unique grouting projects in place that hold promise to support trunk sewer lines installed inside primary-lined tunnels crossing faults.

Magazine Article: Re-Emergence of Chemical Grout

Published Year: 1995

  • Recent studies and over 40 years of experience indicate that America's first trenchless technology is still the best, most effective, long-term defense against infiltration.

Case Study: Consolidating Weakly Cemented Sandstone During Cross-Cut Construction

Published Year: 1960

  • Problem: At Seafield Colliery, three cross-cuts, 16-17 feet wide by 12- feet high, were being driven horizontally through the Millstone Grit series, which contained many weakly cemented and porous sandstones.

Case Study: Stabilizing Soil for Construction Tunnels

Published Year: 1960

  • In this project, two 12-foot diameter by 270-foot long tunnels were to be driven beneath thirteen sets of live railroad tracks on the property of the New York Central, New York, Susquehanna, and Western Railroads.

Case Study: Controlling Seepage During Construction of Underground Missile Bases

Published Year: 1960

  • Problem: With construction still in progress, numerous leaks appeared at the joints and bolt holes of corrugated steel-pipe tunnels connecting missile silos to control centers. Welding and sealing compounds failed to stop seepage.

Case Study: Cutting Water Flow in Colliery Drift

Published Year: 1960

  • Problem: In driving two drifts for this new project, several badly fissured water-bearing rock zones were intercepted. Upon completion, water at the rate of several thousand gallons per hour was entering the drifts from a subterranean water table.

Case Study: Grouting in Fissured Rock

Published Year: 1960

  • Pumping costs at Cedar Bay Mine were becoming excessive, as new drifts were opened and total seepage into the mine increased.

Case Study: Sealing Leaks in Coal Mine Slope

Published Year: 1960

  • During the winter months, small drips from the roof froze into large ice masses, obstructing the passage of men and equipment, and becoming a safety hazard.

Case Study: Sealing Leaks in a Dry Dock

Published Year: 1960

  • Fitzroy Dry Dock, the oldest in Australia, was constructed in the days of sailing ships. Time and water pressure had eroded some of the jointing material, and sea water was entering the dock in a number of places.

Case Study: Sealing Sandstone to Permit Shaft Sinking

Published Year: 1960

  • In one of the deepest drilling operations in British coal mining history, plans called for the sinking of two 3,000-foot shafts, one to be used as a main coal-hoist shaft with skips, the other to house a conventional cage hoist.