Industrial

Leaks in Concrete Structures keep coming back unless they are permanently sealed with chemical grout.

In spite of the best efforts of architects, engineers, and contractors, concrete structures sometimes move in unanticipated places, and cracks appear. If the movement which caused the crack stops, the crack plane becomes stable. However, many cracks do not stabilize. Instead, they continue to move throughout the life of a structure due to thermally induced forces within the structure, or due to soil moisture changes. Such cracks often become wider or narrower at various times throughout the year.

This continuous movement makes it almost impossible to permanently stop water leaks with repair materials which become rigid when they cure. To function as a permanent water-stop, and ideal material would:

  1. Be thin enough to penetrate very small cracks
  2. Set quickly
  3. Bond to wet surfaces
  4. Work in and under water
  5. Possess good elastic strength
  6. Tolerate unavoidable debris

The material would be even better if it were:

  1. Easy to handle
  2. Inert after cure
  3. Approved for contact with potable water
  4. Tolerant to mix variations and field conditions

For over 40 years, chemical grout has been used to stop leaks in basements, commercial buildings, dams, manholes, parking garages, reservoirs, storage tanks, subways, tunnels, wastewater treatment plants, and in other structures. There are four primary reasons why chemical grout is the material of choice to stop leaks:

Fills Cracks Completely

Chemical grout can penetrate any crack that will allow water movement, and fill it with a permanent waterproof seal from the inside of the structure to the outside, from the bottom of the crack to the top.

Remains Flexible

Chemical grout can penetrate any crack that will allow water movement, and fill it with a permanent waterproof seal from the inside of the structure to the outside, from the bottom of the crack to the top.

Forms a Permanent Seal

Chemical grout forms an adhesive bond, a mechanical lock, and a compression seal with the walls of the crack it fills. This prevents any water from by-passing the grout and migrating between it and the walls of the crack. Chemical grout is also extremely resistant to chemical attack.

Safe to Use

Chemical grout is safe to install when handled according to label instructions. Some polyurethane foam grouts are approved for contact with potable water, and some are approved for use near food preparation.

Avanti's Variable Placement Gasket Technique - VPAT

Protection Against Cyclical Structure Movement

When concrete moves it usually cracks, and when it cracks it usually leaks. Any rigid material used to fill the crack is doomed to failure because the concrete will probably move again. If the crack gets smaller, the rigid patch material will shatter. If the crack gets larger, the material will crack and separate, creating a new leak.

Chemical grout cures into a flexible, rubber-like material which can withstand tremendous compression or expansion without being harmed. As a result, it will permanently seal cracks in concrete structures against infiltration or exfiltration.

Protection Against Structural Steel Damage

Surface patching materials such as hydraulic cement or epoxy may prevent groundwater from reaching the interior of a concrete structure, but they cannot penetrate deeply enough to protect structural steel from rust. Corroding metal causes serious damage when it swells and cracks the surrounding concrete.

Chemical grout can penetrate completely through a cracked structure, even hairline cracks, sealing out all water and helping to protect structural steel from harm. This also helps protect the concrete from freeze/thaw damage.